Tag Archives: outdoor photography

  • My Favorite Images of 2013

    Another wonderful year of traveling, exploring, searching, watching, waiting. These are the photographs I took in 2013 which are my favorites. Which is your favorite? (Each image can be viewed larger by clicking on it.)

    Lonely Coast. Late twilight on cliffs edge somewhere on the southern Oregon coast. March. Lonely Coast. Late twilight on a cliff edge somewhere along the southern Oregon coast.
    Fortuna-Falls March. La Fortuna Falls, Costa Rica.
    The-Mighty-and-The-Meek April. The Mighty and The Meek. Trillium growing in the shadow of a towering redwood.
    Tattered-and-Swift May. Tattered and Swift. Thunderstorms looming over Steens Mountain.
    Shadows-Call May. Shadows Call. Spring lupine beneath the stars in the Shasta Valley.
    Gates-of-the-Imnaha June. Gates of The Imnaha. Fleeting spring green in the Imnaha River Canyon.
    Reflection-Lake August. Reflection Lake. A classic sunrise view and reflection of Mt. Rainier.
    Two-Guardians-of-Cape-Arago September. Two Guardians of Cape Arago. Intricate sandstone formations on the Oregon coast illuminated by a fantastic sunrise event.
    Panther-Creek-Falls October. Panther Creek Falls. One of the most delicate and beautiful waterfalls in the Northwest.
    Stillness-and-Light October. Stillness and Light. Compelling geometry, light and color at one of Oregon's most loved landscape scenes.
    Golden November. Golden. A country road disappears into the colors, light and mists of fall in the Rogue Valley.
    Early-Winter December. Early Winters. Alpenglow light at dawn in the central Oregon Cascade Range.
    Sharpened-version December. Ice and Fire. Delicate ice and reflected sunrise light on the Crooked River after an early winter cold snap.

     

    December 31. The final hours of 2103 spent on the Oregon coast. December 31. End Of A Year. The final hours of 2103 spent on the Oregon coast.
  • Photo Cascadia Reception

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    Location: The Cascade Center of Photography

    December 14th, 6-8pm

    Google Map

    Come hang out with the members of Photo Cascadia at a reception at the Cascade Center of Photography. Photo Cascadia consists of six of the top northwest landscape photographers: Chip Phillips, Adrian Klein, David Cobb, Zach Schnepf, Kevin McNeal and Sean Bagshaw. We are all from the Pacific Northwest and share the common interest of photographing the striking beauty of the outdoors, especially the Northwestern United States. It's rare that all six photographers are together in one place.

    Come meet the whole team at the Cascade Center of Photography, 390 SW Columbia Street, Suite 110, Bend, Oregon.

    No registration necessary.

  • Vision of Light Presentation (with Zack Schnepf)

    Autumn-Sunrise-on-the-Deschutes-RiverFriday June 27 2014, 7pm

    Location: Cascade Center of Photography

    390 SW Columbia Street, Suite 110, Bend, Oregon.

    Google Map

    Doors open at 6:30pm

    Sean Bagshaw and Zack Schnepf will present a slide show of their images at the Cascade Center Of Photography. Magical light in the landscape is elusive and difficult to capture, and yet is it the single most important element in a great landscape image. Sean and Zack will discuss their dedication to searching for, seeing and capturing light in the landscape to create their stunning images. They will be sharing some of their favorite rare light images and telling the back story of how each image was created.

    Sign up for the Central Oregon Landscape Photography Workshop with Sean and Zack on June 28 & 29

    Limited space, seat reservation only for workshop participants.

  • Central Oregon Landscape Photography (With Zack Schnepf)

    Join Northwest landscape photographers Sean Bagshaw and Zack Schnepf for an exciting and informative weekend photography workshop in Central Oregon.

    Silence-and-Light

    This workshop has filled. Contact the Cascade Center of Photography to be added to the waiting list.

    When: June 27, 28 & 29 2014

    Where: Cascade Center Of Photography, Bend, Oregon

    Price: $395

    Registration and more information

    Join northwest photographers and Photo Cascadia members, Sean Bagshaw and Zack Schnepf to photograph the dramatic landscapes of Central Oregon. This weekend workshop will focus on landscape photography techniques at three different locations and also includes classroom image developing instruction.

    During the sessions in the field Sean and Zack will be on hand to help with various techniques including camera settings, depth of field, composition, high dynamic range exposures and understanding light. The field shoots will take place in the in the mornings on Saturday and Sunday and in the Evening on Saturday. Each day after the morning shoot the group will convene at the Cascade Center Of Photography for a lesson in the digital developing techniques Sean and Zack use to create their mastered fine art landscape images. This workshop will have a good balance of Photoshop instruction and shooting in the field. We will spend about three hours in the classroom each day. This includes time to work on your own images with guidance. Instructions will be done using Lightroom and Photoshop CS so bring a laptop.

    Vision of Light Presentation Friday June 27. Cascade Center Of Photography, 7pm doors open at 6:30pm

    The opening presentation of the landscape workshop is open to the public. Magical light in the landscape is elusive and difficult to capture, and yet is it the single most important element in a great landscape image. Sean and Zack will discuss their dedication to searching for, seeing and capturing light in the landscape to create their stunning images.They will be sharing some of their favorite rare light images and telling the back story of how each image was created.

  • Olympic National Park (with David Cobb)

    Where Clouds Diverge

    This workshop has filled. Contact David Cobb at the link below to be added to the waiting list.

    When: September 5-8, 2014

    Where: Olympic National Park, Washington

    Price: $400

    This workshop is part of David Cobb's Best of the Northwest workshop series.

    Information and Registration

    I will be teaming up with David Cobb as we explore the wild coastline of Washington's famous Olympic Peninsula. This workshop will concentrate on ocean scenics, dense moss-covered rainforests, spectacular beaches, and tidepools of Washington's Olympic Peninsula.

  • Trip Report: Photographing Oregon's Owyhee Country

    Malheur County may be one of the least known and least visited parts of Oregon. It is located in the extreme southeast corner of the state bordering Idaho and Nevada. Geographically it is one of the largest counties in Oregon with a total area of about 10,000 square miles, but it has one of the lowest population densities at just 3 people per square mile. Most of the population is centered around Ontario and Vale in the northern 15% of the county. Almost everything to the south is open range land managed by the BLM. There is just one paved road, Hwy 95, and one town, Jordan Valley.

    But out in the arid scrub and ranch land of Malheur County lies the Owyhee River. The Owyhee drains a remote area of the high desert plateau on the northern boundary of the Great Basin and flows northward to the Snake River. The various arms and tributaries of the Oywhee cut deep canyons through the Owyhee Plateau, many with vertical rock walls that in places can be over 1,000 feet deep. 120 miles of the Owyhee River Canyon were designated as Wild and Scenic in 1984.

    The southern reaches of the river can only be accessed by dirt roads, some fairly well maintained and others not more than jeep tracks. Even then there are just a handful of spots where it is possible to reach the river by vehicle. Most of the Owyhee and it's tributaries can only be explored by backpacking or rafting.


    People have been suggesting I check out the Owyhee country for years. As it is not along any usual route of travel and many hours from just about anywhere I had never visited this part of the state until this spring. I went to do some exploring and take some photos with fellow photographer, David Cobb, who had previously hiked and photographed portions of the river.

    Finishing the morning shoot at the Cliffs of Rome.

    I was absolutely drawn in by the beauty and scope of the canyons and the surrounding high desert. Along the drive south from Ontario the dirt road first takes you through Succor Creek Canyon which is just a small preview of what's to come, but very scenic in its own right.

    Succor Creek Canyon

    Leslie Gulch is the main attraction along the Lake Owyhee reservoir and provides the easiest access to the river in this area. Throughout the gulch and all along Lake Owyhee the rock spires and escarpments are very reminiscent of Smith Rock State Park only, as David says, “on steroids”. We explored the main Leslie Gulch road and made a couple of forays up side canyons. The area to the north known as the Honeycombs looks particularly enticing but can only be reached by backpacking in or taking a boat over from the west side of the lake.

    North of the town of Jordan Valley you can follow the Jordan Craters Road for about 30 miles into a large lava flow that originates at the Coffee Pot Crater.

    Coffee Pot Crater

    Spatter Cone at Jordan Craters

    View from inside a spatter cone

    Continuing on a side road from there you can wind your way down steep switchbacks and reach the river at the historic Birch Creek Ranch. This is one of the main takeouts for rafters floating the river.

    Cliffs at Birch Creek Ranch

    Birch Creek Ranch

    Southwest of Jordan Valley is the community of Rome. Near Rome there are several dirt roads that offer access to the river canyon as well as the nearby Cliffs of Rome and Chalk Basin further to the north.

    Pillars Of Rome

    South of Hwy 95 between Rome and Jordan Valley, Three Forks road makes it's way across about 30 miles of high desert to join the Owyhee River at Three Forks. David and I were glad to have my 4x4 for this road as we found it heavily rutted after winter rains. We also had to make about three creek crossings, the deepest of which engulfed my front bumper. From the map we saw that we could stop along the road a few miles north of Three Forks and hike out the the canyon rim. Photographing a roadless portion of the wild and scenic Owyhee at sunset sounded appealing, but after a few steps off the road we discovered ticks clinging to our pants. Despite giving David a serious case of the willies we continued on and were able to access a sweeping vista of the canyon before sundown. By the time we completed our hike back in the fading light we had found over 100 ticks between us! A strip search in the headlights revealed several more. I managed to find all of the ones on me, but David found several more lurking on him during the night and didn't get a wink of sleep.

    David trying to ignore the ticks

    Three Forks is a popular put-in for rafters and the presence of hot springs make it an attraction for others as well. My main interest in returning to Three Forks is that this is where the adventurous backpacker can access the branching web of the upper Owyhee Canyon and it's various tributaries. Radiating out from the Three Forks area are no less than six deep and narrow canyons including the Big Antelope, Louse and Middle Fork.

    While I was able to take some exciting photographs on this scouting trip I am excited to get back soon. Future trips will include spending several days rafting and photographing the Owyhee proper as well as doing some back country packing up the tributary canyons south of Three Forks.

  • Exploring Hart Mountain Wildlife Refuge In Winter

    Admittedly, winter is not my most prolific photography season. Cold, darkness and unpredictable weather often get the better of my psyche and I find myself making excuses or prioritizing office work. However, once or twice a winter I do manage to gear up and head someplace windswept and snowy with my camera. This winter Chuck Porter, one of my oldest and best friends, and I spent a couple days exploring the lonesome high desert in the Hart Mountain Antelope Refuge. Back when we were more energetic Chuck and I spent a lot of time climbing cliffs and mountains all over the western US and spurring each other on to complete questionable feats of endurance. Once we hiked the entire length of the Wild and Scenic Rogue River Trail, all 40 plus miles, in a day. Another time we climbed Mt. Shasta, Mt. McLoughlin and Mt. Thielsen in a 21 hour push. These days we are happy just to get out and camp for a weekend and do a little ski touring.

    Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge is a national wildlife refuge on Hart Mountain in southeastern Oregon, which protects more than 422 square miles and more than 300 species of wildlife, including pronghorn antelope, bighorn sheep, mule deer, sage grouse, and redband trout. The refuge, created in 1936 as a range for remnant herds of pronghorn antelope, spans habitats ranging from high desert to shallow playa lakes, and is among the largest wildlife habitats containing no domestic livestock. Located in a remote region of southeastern Oregon at an elevation over 6,000 feet, Hart Mountain is a wild and desolate place any time of year. In winter, blanketed by snow, it becomes a quite and seemingly endless surreal landscape.

    During our visit, Chuck and I skied through a couple of different areas, both very small in the total scale of the refuge. We talked about coming back one winter and skiing all the way across, but we'll see if I ever get the winter motivation to take that on. The two areas we explored on this visit were the hot springs basin below Warner Peak and Petroglyph Lake. Petroglyph Lake is sheltered on one side by a low cliff band that houses several panels of Native American rock art.

    Instead of going on at length about the skiing, sleeping in the car, eating bad food and all the other standard tales from a trip like this I'll just let the photos speak for themselves. You can click on each image to see it larger and then hit the back button to return to the article.

    Hart Mountain rising out of the clouds above Hart Lake.

    Old building at park headquaters.

    Winter Landscape

    Rok Chuk

    Hotsprings basin black and white

    Meandering hotsprings stream

    Skiing toward Petroglyph Lake

    Desolate and windswept

    Warner Peak above the high desert plain

    Skiing around Petroglyph Lake

    Petroglyphs

    Petroglyphs

    Petroglyphs

    Wind sculpted snow

    Skiing in a snow shower

  • SOPA Presentation, May 11

    Puerto Escondido Lighthouse

    On Tuesday, May 11 at 7:00 pm I will be giving a slide presentation to the Southern Oregon Photographic Association. In images and words, I will share a retrospective of my year in photography. Since last spring I have had some wonderful adventures with my camera including photographing locations in the Columbia Gorge, the Oregon Cascades, Lassen Volcanic National Park, the Utah desert, the Oregon coast, Mexican mining towns and beaches and many great spots right here in the Rogue Valley. In addition to sharing some of my photographic vision of the natural world, I will also tell some tall travel tales and discuss some of the techniques I use to create my images. Call Terry Tuttle at 541-779-3396 or go to www.sopacameraclub.org for information.

  • Finally Some New Images On The Site

    I really enjoy almost every aspect of the work I do. Going out in search of light and visually enticing scenes to photograph takes effort, but it is also good fun and a worthy challenge. The countless hours I spend painstakingly guiding each image through my workflow, applying the processing and developing skills I have learned over the last decade is also quite enjoyable and rewarding too. So is producing prints, and sharing my images with others on various websites, in publicatons and at galleries and exhibits. However, I have to admit that the tide of progress often stops flowing when it comes time to introduce new images on my own website. We all have portions of our work that is less engaging and more tedious than others. The process of putting new images on my site, which is the way that I share them with my largest audience, requires several layers of work I don't particularly look forward to.

    I'll spare you all the details, but in brief it requires renumbering all the images to be uploaded, creating web sized images and thumbnails for each image, giving each image a title, keywords, caption and the organizing it into various departments and categories within the structure of my site. Once all the data entry is complete the database is uploaded to the software that uses the information to create the web pages and link structure for the new content. Any mistakes or typos cause havoc on my site, so I have to look carefully for bugs, repair them in the database and then allow the software to build the site again. Depending on how many images there are, the entire process can take me as much as a week.

    Needless to say, this chore often slips off the top of my to do list to make way for more engaging or more pressing business. It has been nearly eight months since I last added new images to www.OutdoorExposurePhoto.com but I finally got it done. The good news is that there is now a large collection of new work created in the last year up on my site just waiting to meet the public. If you are keen to take a look at the photography I've been up to I invite you to take a look at my latest additions.


    I wonder when I'll catch up with the hundreds of stock images still waiting for their turn to see the light of day?

  • Pacific Northwest Photography Podcast Interview

    Talented outdoor photographer, Adrian Klein, is now producing a great podcast called Pacific Northwest Photography. Adrian recently interviewed me for his podcast, which you can listen to on the player above. During our conversation we chatted about favorite locations, adventures and photography equipment. I also give the behind the scenes tales of the two images below. You can also get the complete story behind my intolerance of goat flavored food products.

    I highly recommend checking out Adrian's photography at www.adrianklein.com

    and his photography blog at http://adriankleinphoto.blogspot.com/

    On Adrian's home page you can subscribe to his PNWP Podcast by clicking the red musical note.

    Lunar Eclipse Over Mt. Shasta

    Lunar Eclipse Over Mt. Shasta

    Double Falls, Glacier National Park

    Double Falls, Glacier National Park

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